/Microdynamic Systems Laboratory

Microdynamic Systems Laboratory

In the Microdynamic Systems Laboratory we are exploring the limits of robotics in terms of speed, precision, dexterity and miniaturization. This endeavor requires development of new sensing, actuation, and control technologies for agile robotic systems that can be applied to a variety of real-world situations. Major themes of our work include moving toward robotics operating at or below the micrometer scale, simplifying robotic mechanisms while providing greater functionality through software, and providing new ways for humans to interact with the world through robotics. Examples include sensor-moderated coarse-fine manipulation, miniature factories for precision assembly, magnetic levitation haptic interfaces that allow humans to interact with remote or simulated environments through the sense of touch, dynamically-stable mobile robots for human environments, and high-speed walking machines.

Displaying 91 Publications

Lab Students

We are developing actuation methods for highly dynamic legged locomotion.

Reduction of time to market in agile manufacturing

Speeding up of the paint spray-gun path programming by automation, achieving uniform coverage.

We are developing novel dynamically-stable rolling machine and walking machine research platforms...

We are developing autonomous planar motors for precision positioning.

Interacting with 3-dimensional physically-based virtual environments using a six-degree-of-freedo...

Quantitative comparisons of human subjects performing peg-in-hole experiments with real, virtual,...

We are developing a six legged robot capable of achieving a wide variety of dynamically dextrous t...

We are developing a bioinspired climbing robot with the unique ability to walk on land and climb o...

High-fidelity manipulation of remote environments using a 6-DOF robot equipped with a 6-DOF magne...

We are designing a bipedal robot to be capable of running, walking, jumping, hopping, and generall...

Precision automated assembly using coarse-fine positioning.

What You can See is What You Feel (WYSIWYF) virtual environment

2019-08-09T10:18:28-05:00