Predictability or Adaptivity? Designing Robot Handoffs Modeled from Trained Dogs and People

Min Kyung Lee, Maya Cakmak, Sara Kiesler, Jodi Forlizzi, and Siddhartha Srinivasa
6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, January, 2011.


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Abstract
One goal of assistive robotics is to design interactive robots that can help disabled people with tasks such as fetching objects. When people do this task, they coordinate their movements closely with receivers. We investigated how a robot should fetch and give household objects to a person. To develop a model for the robot, we first studied trained dogs and person-to-person handoffs. Our findings suggest two models of handoff that differ in their predictability and adaptivity.

Notes
Number of pages: 2
Note: Late-breaking report

Text Reference
Min Kyung Lee, Maya Cakmak, Sara Kiesler, Jodi Forlizzi, and Siddhartha Srinivasa, "Predictability or Adaptivity? Designing Robot Handoffs Modeled from Trained Dogs and People," 6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction, January, 2011.

BibTeX Reference
@inproceedings{Lee_2011_6789,
   author = "Min Kyung Lee and Maya Cakmak and Sara Kiesler and Jodi Forlizzi and Siddhartha Srinivasa",
   title = "Predictability or Adaptivity? Designing Robot Handoffs Modeled from Trained Dogs and People",
   booktitle = "6th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction",
   month = "January",
   year = "2011",
   Notes = "Late-breaking report"
}