Atlas-Based Hippocampus Segmentation In Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Owen Carmichael, Howard Aizenstein, Simon W. Davis, Jim Becker, Paul M. Thompson, Carolyn Meltzer, and Yanxi Liu
NeuroImage, No. 27, June, 2005, pp. 979 - 990.


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Abstract
This study assesses the performance of public-domain automated methodologies for MRI-based segmentation of the hippocampus in elderly subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Structural MR images of 54 age- and gender- matched healthy elderly individuals, subjects with probable AD, and subjects with MCI were collected at the University of Pittsburgh Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. Hippocampi in subject images were automatically segmented by using AIR, SPM, FLIRT, and the fully deformable method of Chen to align the images to the Harvard atlas, MNI atlas, and randomly selected, manually labeled subject images (``cohort atlases''). Mixed-effects statistical models analyzed the effects of side of the brain, disease state, registration method, choice of atlas, and manual tracing protocol on the spatial overlap between automated segmentations and expert manual segmentations. Registra- tion methods that produced higher degrees of geometric deformation produced automated segmentations with higher agreement with manual segmentations. Side of the brain, presence of AD, choice of reference image, and manual tracing protocol were also significant factors contributing to automated segmentation performance. Fully automated techniques can be competitive with human raters on this difficult segmentation task, but a rigorous statistical analysis shows that a variety of methodological factors must be carefully considered to insure that automated methods perform well in practice. The use of fully deformable registration methods, cohort atlases, and user-defined manual tracings are recommended for highest performance in fully automated hippocampus segmentation.

Notes
Associated Center(s) / Consortia: Vision and Autonomous Systems Center and Medical Robotics Technology Center
Associated Lab(s) / Group(s): Biomedical Image Analysis
Associated Project(s): Predicting Risk of Alzheimer\'s Disease From Shape Features
Number of pages: 12
Note: in press

Text Reference
Owen Carmichael, Howard Aizenstein, Simon W. Davis, Jim Becker, Paul M. Thompson, Carolyn Meltzer, and Yanxi Liu, "Atlas-Based Hippocampus Segmentation In Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment," NeuroImage, No. 27, June, 2005, pp. 979 - 990.

BibTeX Reference
@article{Carmichael_2005_5030,
   author = "Owen Carmichael and Howard Aizenstein and Simon W. Davis and Jim Becker and Paul M. Thompson and Carolyn Meltzer and Yanxi Liu",
   title = "Atlas-Based Hippocampus Segmentation In Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment",
   journal = "NeuroImage",
   pages = "979 - 990",
   month = "June",
   year = "2005",
   number = "27",
   Notes = "in press"
}