Automatically assessing oral reading fluency in a computer tutor that listens

Joseph E. Beck, P. Jia, and Jack Mostow
Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning, Vol. 1, 2004, pp. 61 - 81.


Download
  • Adobe portable document format (pdf) (208KB)
Copyright notice: This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. These works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

Abstract
Much of the power of a computer tutor comes from its ability to assess students. In some domains, including oral reading, assessing the proficiency of a student is a challenging task for a computer. Our approach for assessing student reading proficiency is to use data that a computer tutor collects through its interactions with a student to estimate his performance on a human-administered test of oral reading fluency. A model with data collected from the tutor's speech recognizer output correlated, within-grade, at 0.78 on average with student performance on the fluency test. For assessing students, data from the speech recognizer were more useful than student help-seeking behavior. However, adding help-seeking behavior increased the average within-grade correlation to 0.83. These results show that speech recognition is a powerful source of data about student performance, particularly for reading.

Notes
Associated Lab(s) / Group(s): Project LISTEN
Number of pages: 21

Text Reference
Joseph E. Beck, P. Jia, and Jack Mostow, "Automatically assessing oral reading fluency in a computer tutor that listens," Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning, Vol. 1, 2004, pp. 61 - 81.

BibTeX Reference
@article{Beck_2004_4990,
   author = "Joseph E Beck and P. Jia and Jack Mostow",
   title = "Automatically assessing oral reading fluency in a computer tutor that listens",
   journal = "Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning",
   pages = "61 - 81",
   year = "2004",
   volume = "1",
}