Helping Children Learn Vocabulary During Computer-Assisted Oral Reading

Gregory Aist
Educational Technology and Society, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2002


Abstract
This paper addresses an indispensable skill using a unique method to teach a critical component: helping children learn to read by using computer-assisted oral reading to help children learn vocabulary. We build on Project LISTEN's Reading Tutor, a computer program that adapts automatic speech recognition to listen to children read aloud, and helps them learn to read (http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~listen). To learn a word from reading with the Reading Tutor, students must encounter the word and learn the meaning of the word in context. We modified the Reading Tutor first to help students encounter new words and then to help them learn the meanings of new words. We then compared the Reading Tutor to classroom instruction and to human-assisted oral reading as part of a yearlong study with 144 second and third graders. The result: Second graders did about the same on word comprehension in all three conditions. However, third graders who read with the 1999 Reading Tutor, modified as described in this paper, performed statistically significantly better than other third graders in a classroom control on word comprehension gains - and even comparably with other third graders who read one-on-one with human tutors.

Notes
Associated Lab(s) / Group(s): Project LISTEN
Associated Project(s): Project LISTEN\'s Reading Tutor

Text Reference
Gregory Aist, "Helping Children Learn Vocabulary During Computer-Assisted Oral Reading," Educational Technology and Society, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2002

BibTeX Reference
@article{Aist_2002_4068,
   author = "Gregory Aist",
   title = "Helping Children Learn Vocabulary During Computer-Assisted Oral Reading",
   journal = "Educational Technology and Society",
   year = "2002",
   volume = "5",
   number = "2",
}