Speech Recognition Applied to Reading Assistance for Children: A Baseline Language Model

A. G. Hauptmann, Lin Chase, and Jack Mostow
Proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology (EUROSPEECH93), September, 1993, pp. 2255-2258.


Abstract
We describe an approach to using speech recognition in assisting children's reading. A state-of-the-art speaker independent continuous speech recognizer designed for large vocabulary dictation is adapted to the task of identifying substitutions and omissions in a known text. A baseline language model for this new task is detailed and evaluated against a corpus of children reading graded passages. We are able to identify words missed by a reader with an average false positive rate of 39% and a corresponding false negative rate of 37%. These preliminary results are encouraging for our long-term goal of providing automated coaching for children learning to read.

Notes
Associated Lab(s) / Group(s): Project LISTEN

Text Reference
A. G. Hauptmann, Lin Chase, and Jack Mostow, "Speech Recognition Applied to Reading Assistance for Children: A Baseline Language Model," Proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology (EUROSPEECH93), September, 1993, pp. 2255-2258.

BibTeX Reference
@inproceedings{Chase_1993_3703,
   author = "A. G. Hauptmann and Lin Chase and Jack Mostow",
   title = "Speech Recognition Applied to Reading Assistance for Children: A Baseline Language Model",
   booktitle = "Proceedings of the 3rd European Conference on Speech Communication and Technology (EUROSPEECH93)",
   pages = "2255-2258",
   month = "September",
   year = "1993",
}