Giving Help and Praise in a Reading Tutor with Imperfect Listening - Because Automated Speech Recognition Means Never Being Able to Say You're Certain

Jack Mostow and Greg Aist
CALICO Journal, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1999, pp. 407 - 424.


Download
  • Adobe portable document format (pdf) (105KB)
Copyright notice: This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. These works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

Abstract
Human tutors make use of a wide range of input and output modalities, such as speech, vision, gaze, and gesture. Computer tutors are typically limited to keyboard and mouse input. Project LISTEN?s Reading Tutor uses speech recognition technology to listen to children read aloud and help them. Why should a computer tutor listen? A computer tutor that listens can give help and praise naturally and unobtrusively. We address the following questions: When and how should a computer tutor that listens help students? When and how should it praise students? We examine how the advantages and disadvantages of speech recognition technology helped shape the design and implementation of the Reading Tutor. Despite its limitations, this technology enables the Reading Tutor to provide patient, unobtrusive, and natural assistance for reading aloud.

Notes
Associated Lab(s) / Group(s): Project LISTEN
Note: Special issue, Tutorsthat Listen: Speech recognition for Language Learning

Text Reference
Jack Mostow and Greg Aist, "Giving Help and Praise in a Reading Tutor with Imperfect Listening - Because Automated Speech Recognition Means Never Being Able to Say You're Certain," CALICO Journal, Vol. 16, No. 3, 1999, pp. 407 - 424.

BibTeX Reference
@article{Mostow_1999_3248,
   author = "Jack Mostow and Greg Aist",
   editor = "M. Holland",
   title = "Giving Help and Praise in a Reading Tutor with Imperfect Listening - Because Automated Speech Recognition Means Never Being Able to Say You're Certain",
   journal = "CALICO Journal",
   pages = "407 - 424",
   year = "1999",
   volume = "16",
   number = "3",
   Notes = "Special issue, Tutorsthat Listen: Speech recognition for Language Learning"
}