Ground Penetrating Radar Data Acquisition System

Robert Beck, Jay Cosentino, David W. Collier, and James Osborn
tech. report CMU-RI-TR-91-11, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, June, 1991


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Abstract
Carnegie Mellon University is automating the use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for cleanup of hazardous waste sites. The Site Investigation Robot (SIR) project at the Field Robotics Center is applying robotics and image processing technologies to the investigatory phase of these waste site cleanups. The current focus is on the development of an automated subsurface mapping system to locate buried objects and geological structures so that sources and migratory pathways of contaminants can be identified and cataloged. The subsurface maps are produced using the non-invasive sensing abilities of Ground Penetrating Radar. GPR operates on principles similar to conventional radar, but the data acquired is more difficult to process due to the heterogeneous nature of the subsurface medium. GPR deployment, data acquisition, and interpretation are traditionally human-driven processes which expose operators to potentially dangerous environments. Automating the GPR data collection process eliminates this undesirable situation. Accurate three dimensional subsurface maps of GPR data have not yet been generated in the field. However, the SIR project uses robots to position GPR transducers to exploit the accurate, repeatable positioning available from automated equipment. By combining the use of a position-cognizant, all-terrain mobile robot and a linear scanning mechanism, it is possible to acquire GPR records in a two-dimensional grid on the ground surface.

Notes
Grant ID: N00014-81-0503, N00014-90-J-1656
Number of pages: 11

Text Reference
Robert Beck, Jay Cosentino, David W. Collier, and James Osborn, "Ground Penetrating Radar Data Acquisition System," tech. report CMU-RI-TR-91-11, Robotics Institute, Carnegie Mellon University, June, 1991

BibTeX Reference
@techreport{Osborn_1991_255,
   author = "Robert Beck and Jay Cosentino and David W. Collier and James Osborn",
   title = "Ground Penetrating Radar Data Acquisition System",
   booktitle = "",
   institution = "Robotics Institute",
   month = "June",
   year = "1991",
   number= "CMU-RI-TR-91-11",
   address= "Pittsburgh, PA",
}