Simulating DIC Microscope Images: From Physical Principles to Computational Model.

Farhana Kagalwala and Takeo Kanade
Proceedings of Workshop on Photometric Modelling in Computer Vision and Graphics, June, 1999, pp. 48 - 55.


Download
  • Adobe portable document format (pdf) (269KB)
Copyright notice: This material is presented to ensure timely dissemination of scholarly and technical work. Copyright and all rights therein are retained by authors or by other copyright holders. All persons copying this information are expected to adhere to the terms and constraints invoked by each author's copyright. These works may not be reposted without the explicit permission of the copyright holder.

Abstract
Differential Interference Contrast (DIC) microscopy is a powerful visualization tool to study live biological cells. Its use in quantitative analysis, however, is limited by the nonlinear relation between image and object. Combining concepts from graphics and physics, we model these nonlinearities using a generalized ray tracer. We verify our model by comparing real image data of manufactured specimens to simulated images of virtual objects. We plan to use this model to iteratively reconstruct the three-dimensional properties of unknown specimens.

Keywords
computational sensors, graphics, light-propagation model,

Notes
Associated Center(s) / Consortia: Vision and Autonomous Systems Center
Associated Project(s): 3D Optical Reconstruction of Cell Shape
Number of pages: 8

Text Reference
Farhana Kagalwala and Takeo Kanade, "Simulating DIC Microscope Images: From Physical Principles to Computational Model.," Proceedings of Workshop on Photometric Modelling in Computer Vision and Graphics, June, 1999, pp. 48 - 55.

BibTeX Reference
@inproceedings{Kagalwala_1999_2119,
   author = "Farhana Kagalwala and Takeo Kanade",
   editor = "Sang W. Lee",
   title = "Simulating DIC Microscope Images: From Physical Principles to Computational Model.",
   booktitle = "Proceedings of Workshop on Photometric Modelling in Computer Vision and Graphics",
   pages = "48 - 55",
   publisher = "IEEE",
   month = "June",
   year = "1999",
}