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Lee Weiss
Research Professor, RI
Email:
Office: NSH 3113
Phone: (412) 268-7657
Fax: 412-268-5571
  Mailing address:
Carnegie Mellon University
Robotics Institute
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Administrative Assistant: Karen R. Widmaier
Affiliated Center(s):
 Medical Robotics Technology Center (MRTC)
Personal Homepage

Current Projects
 
Biodegradable Electronics
We are developing implantable biodegradable electronic devices offer the potential to provide therapeutic functions for limited periods of time - weeks to months – degrading in register with the anticipated needs of the application and thus not requiring surgical removal. One application is a biodegradable radio frequency (RF) power generator connected to electrical stimulating electrodes to enhance bone regeneration.
BioMEMS
We are developing implantable, wireless MEMs-based sensors for various applications, such as monitoring bone regeneration and left ventricular pressure, to provide timely feedback to clinicians to help make better decisions on timing of therapeutic interventions.
Bioprinting
We have designed and built inkjet-based bioprinters to controllably deposit spatial patterns of various growth factors and other signaling molecules on and in biodegradable scaffold materials to guide tissue regeneration.
Blood-Plasma Based Bioplastics
We have developed a manufacturing process to convert donated blood plasma and platelets into inexpensive, off-the-shelf bioactive plastics to enhance and accelerate tissue healing. These materials contain nature’s own mix of growth factors in highly concentrated solid to semi-solid forms that controllably elute these factors as the bioplastics degrade. This technology is currently in human clinical trials.
Cell Tracking
We are developing fully-automated computer vision-based cell tracking algorithms and a system that automatically determines the spatiotemporal history of dense populations of cells over extended period of time.
Quality of Life Technology (QoLT)
QoLT is a unique partnership between Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pittsburgh that brings together a cross-disciplinary team of technologists, clinicians, industry partners, end users, and other stakeholders to create revolutionary technologies that will improve and sustain the quality of life for all people.

Note: The QoLT Project has been superseded by the QoLT Center.
Real-Time Computer Vision-Based Cell Tracking
In collaboration with Intel, we are developing systems to track the spatiotemporal history of each and every cell and their progeny in stem cultures. Such systems can be used for applications ranging from basic biological discovery to QA/QC/optimization of stem cell expansion processes, i.e., processes to grow relatively small numbers of stem cells harvested from a patient into the millions of cells needed for therapeutic delivery of these cells back into the patient.