Advanced Search   
  Look in
       Name    Email
  Include
       Former RI Members 
 
 
Reid Simmons
Research Prof/Assoc Dir Educ/PhD Chair, RI/CS
Email:
Office: NSH 3213
Phone: (412) 268-2621
Fax: 412-268-7350
  Mailing address:
Carnegie Mellon University
Robotics Institute
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Administrative Assistant: Karen R. Widmaier
Affiliated Center(s):
 Space Robotics Initiative (SRI)
 Quality of Life Technology Center (QoLT)
Personal Homepage

News and Media
 
Robot Invites Humans to Play Mean Game of SCRABBLE
March 25, 2014. Carnegie Mellon University researchers have developed a SCRABBLE-playing robot to explore what will cause people to engage with robots for extended periods and to enjoy it. The project anticipates the day when humans and robots will interact routinely at work and at home.
Victor the Gamebot Hits Front Page of Wall Street Journal
March 17, 2014. Victor the Gamebot, who plays SCRABBLE and trashtalks with humans on the third floor of the Gates and Hillman centers, is the subject of a feature in the Wall Street Journal. Victor is the latest social robot developed under the leadership of Reid Simmons, research professor in the Robotics Institute.
Additional Major in Robotics Is New Option for CMU Undergrads
October 10, 2012. Students pursuing computer science, engineering or other undergraduate degrees at Carnegie Mellon University will have the option this fall to include an additional major in robotics. The Robotics Institute already offers more undergraduate robotics courses than any other university in the world and for the past 12 years has offered an undergraduate minor in robotics. The additional major in robotics, however, responds to the growing interest of students in this multidisciplinary field and to demands by employers for more graduates with a deep understanding of this critical technology.
Robotics Institute Featured in National Geographic's August Issue
August 11, 2011. National Geographic magazine's August 2011 issue considers how robots and humans will increasingly interact in the not-so-distant future. The article by Chris Carroll discusses Robotics Institute projects, including the Home Exploring Robotic Butler (HERB) and Snackbot, and the Entertainment Technology Center's efforts to make a Japanese android more human-like.