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Randy Sargent
Senior Systems Scientist, RI
Email:
Office: NSH 4629
Phone: (650) 575-1612
  Mailing address:
Carnegie Mellon University
Robotics Institute
5000 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

News and Media
 
Interactive Map Shows Income Inequality Using “Capital in the 21st Century” Data
May 07, 2014. Readers of the provocative bestseller “Capital in the 21st Century,” who want to take a closer look at the income database analyzed by economist and author Thomas Piketty can take advantage of a new online tool, Explorable Inequality, created by the Robotics Institute's CREATE Lab.
Time Lapse GigaPan Holds Promise for Plant Research
March 04, 2014. Research by scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Robotics Institute shows that high-resolution, time-lapse photography, such as GigaPan Time Machine, can help scientists study plant behavior over vast scales outside of the laboratory.
Robotics Institute Helps Make Stunning Satellite Imagery Easily Accessible
May 09, 2013. Members of the public can now easily explore almost 30 years of Earth imagery from NASA’s Landsat through TIME Magazine’s new Timelapse project. The project is a collaborative effort between TIME, Google, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), with the assistance of Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute.
Robotics Institute and Google Create New Tool for Accessing Imagery
July 30, 2012. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute, working with colleagues at Google and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), have adapted their technology for interactively exploring time-lapse imagery to create a tool that enables anyone to easily access 13 years of NASA Landsat images of the Earth’s surface.
Inside Science Explores GigaPan Time Machine
March 08, 2012. Inside Science Television, produced by the American Institute of Physics, features GigaPan and GigaPan Time Machine in a new video. The GigaPan system, developed by the Robotics Institute's CREATE Lab and NASA, enables ordinary digital cameras to produce panoramic images and videos that can be interactively explored on a computer monitor.
GigaPan Time Machine Aids Discovery About Black Holes
December 12, 2011. With the help of GigaPan Time Machine, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology have discovered what caused the rapid growth of early supermassive black holes. GigaPan Time Machine, developed by the Robotics Institute’s CREATE Lab, aided astrophysicists Tiziana Di Matteo and Rupert Croft in analyzing MassiveBlack, a recreation of the first billion years after the Big Bang and the largest cosmological simulation to date.
CREATE Lab Releases New GigaPan Time Machine Data
November 17, 2011. The Robotics Institute’s GigaPan Time Machine project has released eight new data sets, including a 24-hour observation of the sun by NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft. Like previous Time Machines, the dynamic imagery can be explored interactively across both time and space. Read Scientific American’s story.
CREATE Lab Builds Time Machine to Explore Space and Time
April 21, 2011. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute have leveraged the latest browser technology to create GigaPan Time Machine, a system that enables viewers to explore gigapixel-scale, high-resolution videos and image sequences by panning or zooming in and out of the images while simultaneously moving back and forth through time.“With GigaPan Time Machine, you can simultaneously explore space and time at extremely high resolutions,” said Illah Nourbakhsh, associate professor of robotics and head of the CREATE Lab. “Science has always been about narrowing your point of view — selecting a particular experiment or observation that you think might provide insight. But this system enables what we call exhaustive science, capturing huge amounts of data that can then be explored in amazing ways.”
Science By The Billboard
September 30, 2010. A “bait ball” of salema fish swirling off the Galapagos Islands, one of the world’s largest Adelie penguin colonies basking on an Antarctic beach and ancient petroglyphs in northern Saudi Arabia depicting hunters and their prey are three of the arresting scientific panoramas selected for a juried gallery show in conjunction with the Fine International Conference on Gigapixel Imagery for Science, Nov. 11-13.