Carnegie Mellon University
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Martial Hebert
Director, Robotics Institute, RI
Email:
Office: NSH 4113
Phone: (412) 268-2585
  Mailing address:
Carnegie Mellon University
Robotics Institute
5000 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213
Administrative Assistant: Lynnetta J. Miller
Affiliated Center(s):
 Vision and Autonomous Systems Center (VASC)
 Quality of Life Technology Center (QoLT)
 Center for the Foundations of Robotics (CFR)
Personal Homepage

News and Media
 
Robotics Hub Will Leverage CMU’s Rich Talent Pool to Foster Pittsburgh Startups
August 11, 2015. A Pittsburgh venture capital fund, Coal Hill Ventures, is launching a new business accelerator, dubbed the Robotics Hub, to identify, build, and guide the most promising startups – regardless of origin - in the burgeoning field of advanced robotics. GE Ventures is its founding sponsor.
Time Video Highlights CMU’s Role in Pittsburgh’s Comeback
July 10, 2015. A newly released video from Time magazine, Pittsburgh: The Comeback, highlights the role of technology, and particularly the contributions of Carnegie Mellon University, in the revitalization of Pittsburgh. SCS Dean Andrew Moore and Robotics Institute Director Marital Hebert are among the community leaders interviewed on camera.
Robotics Institute Style: Alums’ App Provides Tool for Fashionistas
January 05, 2015. Robotics Institute alumnus Henry Kang used the subject of his Ph.D. research, image-based object recognition, to help create an iPhone app, StyleIt, that gives users advice on how to create stylish outfits.
Martial Hebert Named Director of Robotics Institute
November 06, 2014. Martial Hebert, a leading researcher in computer vision and robotics at Carnegie Mellon University since 1984, will become director of the university’s Robotics Institute, effective as of Nov. 15, School of Computer Science Dean Andrew W. Moore announced.
More Than a Good Eye: HERB Uses Arms and More To Discover Objects
May 06, 2013. A robot can struggle to discover objects in its surroundings when it relies on computer vision alone. But by taking advantage of all of the information available to it — an object’s location, size, shape and even whether it can be lifted — a robot can continually discover and refine its understanding of objects, say researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute.