Carnegie Mellon University
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Official Press Releases
Omnidirectional Mobile Robot Has Just Two Moving Parts
October 04, 2016. More than a decade ago, Ralph Hollis invented the ballbot, an elegantly simple robot whose tall, thin body glides atop a sphere slightly smaller than a bowling ball. The latest version, called SIMbot, has an equally elegant motor with just one moving part: the ball. The only other active moving part of the robot is the body itself. Its spherical induction motor (SIM) eliminates the mechanical drive systems used on previous ballbots and is less likely to suffer mechanical failures.
New Project Helps K-12 Students Become Fluent With Data and Technology
August 17, 2016. The future success of today’s students hinges more than ever on their ability to think critically, and creatively manipulate technology, media and data. Helping them achieve this level of fluency is the goal of a new project led by Carnegie Mellon University and sponsored by The Heinz Endowments.
CREATE Lab Expands Education Network Nationally
August 02, 2016. A program to empower students with technology by leveraging Carnegie Mellon University’s robotics and computer science talent with education expertise at partner universities is expanding beyond the Western Pennsylvania/West Virginia region to include satellite labs in Georgia and Utah.
Computational Design Tool Transforms Flat Materials Into 3-D Shapes
July 18, 2016. A new computational design tool can turn a flat sheet of plastic or metal into a complex 3-D shape, such as a mask, a sculpture or even a lady’s high-heel shoe. Researchers at the Robotics Institute and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland (EPFL), say the tool enables designers to fully and creatively exploit an unusual quality of certain materials — the ability to expand uniformly in two dimensions.
Studying the Role Love Plays in an Engineering Project
June 27, 2016. The development of an electronic Braille writing tutor at a school for the blind in India has been a labor of love over the past decade for M. Bernardine Dias and her Carnegie Mellon University colleagues, students and staff. And for the past year, it has provided a research window into the role love plays in engineering.
Robots Get Creative To Cut Through The Clutter
May 18, 2016. Clutter is a special challenge for robots, but new Carnegie Mellon University software is helping robots cope, whether they’re beating a path across the Moon or grabbing a milk jug from the back of the refrigerator. The software not only helped a robot deal efficiently with clutter, it surprisingly revealed the robot’s creativity in solving problems.
Robot’s In-Hand Eye Maps Surroundings, Determines Hand’s Location
May 16, 2016. Before a robot arm can reach into a tight space or pick up a delicate object, the robot needs to know precisely where its hand is. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute have shown that a camera attached to the robot’s hand can rapidly create a 3-D model of its environment and also locate the hand within that 3-D world.
DOE Selects Robotics Institute For Environmental Remediation Training
March 16, 2016. The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management has selected Carnegie Mellon University to provide specialized training for graduate students in robotics to support environmental remediation of nuclear sites.
NREC Selected For Research Projects Totaling More Than $11 Million
March 08, 2016. Carnegie Mellon University’s National Robotics Engineering Center (NREC) has been selected as a prime contractor or subcontractor on four major new federal research projects totaling more than $11 million over the next three years. The projects range from research on a wheel that can transform into a track to automated stress testing for critical software.
CMU, Airviz Will Make Air Quality Monitors Available to Libraries
March 15, 2016. Learning about the quality of the air you breathe should be as easy and inexpensive as borrowing a book from a library, and that’s why Carnegie Mellon University researchers plan to provide free Speck air quality monitors to 100 public libraries nationwide.