Keynote Speakers

The conference will feature these keynote speakers:

Hirochika Inoue
Russell Taylor
Gerd Hirzinger

 
Hirochika Inoue
Department of Mechano-Informatics, The University of Tokyo, JAPAN

Experimental Studies on Humans and Humanoids

Abstract

This talk attempts to discuss where experimental robotics shall go in the new century. For a long time, robots have been considered "objects to be created". After four decades of robotics research, we are reaching a new stage of robotics R&D. Companies are going to provide various robots to the end-user market. The Humanoid Robotics Project of Japan intends to develop and provide a platform for humanoid R&D. Now, robots are not only objects to be built, but also tools to be used for studying humans and robots. We can view a humanoid as a human-shaped robot, but also, we can recognize the humanoid as novel computing machinery, which can not only compute, but also behave. We are obtaining a powerful new tool for the experimental study of humans and humanoids.

This talk consists of four parts, taking examples from our research at the University of Tokyo. In Part One, four key technologies of robotics will be introduced: (1) sensor-implanted soft tactile skin, (2) robots with spine as an example of soft mechanical structure, (3) real-time 3D robot vision systems and (4) simulation and motion planning of robots and environments. Part Two deals with system integration. First, the remote-brained approach to robotics is introduced with some experimental examples. Then, the study of humanoid robots at our laboratory will be introduced: H3, an upper-body humanoid mounted on a wheeled base, designed to be controlled remotely over a network; H5, a prototype human-shaped robot, designed for the study of dynamic walk; and H6, a humanoid platform for integrating various functions of softness and intelligence. In Part Three, the HRP project, a Japanese national project for R&D of humanoid and human-friendly robotics will be introduced. The project attempts a platform-based R&D for seeking applications of humanoid robots in practical settings.

And lastly, in Part Four, I will discuss some topics for robotics research in the coming century. At a time when we are entering into a new millennium, we are standing on a new robotics setting. From there, three ways seem to be open: (1) advanced R&D of robotics core technologies, (2) real applications for human-centered robotized society, and (3) synthetic study of human behavior science.



Russell Taylor
Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology, Johns Hopkins University, USA

The Future of Medical Robots in Computer-Integrated Surgery

Abstract

The impact of Computer-Integrated Surgery (CIS) on medicine in the next 20 years will be as great as that of Computer-Integrated Manufacturing on industrial production over the past 20 years. A novel partnership between human surgeons and machines, made possible by advances in computing and engineering technology, will overcome many of the limitations of traditional surgery. By extending human surgeons’ ability to plan and carry out surgical interventions more accurately and less invasively, CIS systems will address a vital national need to greatly reduce costs, improve clinical outcomes, and improve the efficiency of health care delivery. As CIS systems evolve, we expect to see the emergence of two dominant and complementary paradigms: Surgical CAD/CAM systems will integrate accurate patient-specific models, surgical plan optimization, and a variety of execution environments permitting the plans to be carried out accurately, safely, and with minimal invasiveness. Surgical Assistant systems will work cooperatively with human surgeons in carrying out precise and minimally invasive surgical procedures.

This presentation will focus on the emerging role of medical robots within CIS systems, with special attention to the synergy between the development of image-guided, robotically-assisted delivery systems and the development of novel minimally invasive localized therapies. It will draw upon current and ongoing research in the newly established NSF Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology and elsewhere to illustrate these themes.

 

Speaker Biography

Russell H. Taylor received a B.E.S. degree from The Johns Hopkins University in 1970 and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford in 1976. He joined IBM Research in 1976, where he developed the AML robot language. Following a two year assignment in Boca Raton, he managed robotics and automation technology research activities at IBM Research from 1982 until returning to full time technical work in late 1988. From March 1990 to September 1995, he was manager of Computer Assisted Surgery. In September 1995, Dr. Taylor moved to Johns Hopkins University as a Professor of Computer Science. He is currently a Professor of Computer Science, Radiology, and Mechanical Engineering and is Director of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Computer-Integrated Surgical Systems and Technology at Johns Hopkins. His research interests include robot systems, programming languages, model-based planning, and (most recently) the use of imaging, model-based planning, and robotic systems to augment human performance in surgical procedures. He is Editor Emeritus of the IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, a Fellow of the IEEE, and a member of various honorary societies, panels, editorial boards, and program committees. Dr. Taylor is a member of the scientific advisory board for Integrated Surgical Systems. In February, 2000 he received the Maurice Müller award for excellence in computer-assisted orthopaedic surgery.


Gerd Hirzinger
Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics, German Aerospace Center (DLR), GERMANY

A New Generation of Light-weight Robot Arms and Multifingered Hands

Abstract

The talk describes recent design and development efforts in DLR's robotics lab towards a new generation of ultra-light weight robots with articulated hands. The design of fully sensorized joints with complete state feedback and the underlying mechanisms are outlined. The second joint torque-controlled light-weight arm generation is available now, as well as the second generation of a highly integrated 4 finger-hand implying 13 actuators and more than 100 sensors. Thus we hope that important steps towards a new generation of service and personal robots have been achieved, with space robotics becoming a major driver due to the need for advanced "robonaut" technologies.

 
Hirochika Inoue
Russell Taylor
Gerd Hirzinger