Event Schedule    [Event Overview]    
  Monday | Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday | Transportation Pass Information
         
Monday, October 11, 2004  Robot Hall of Fame Induction &
Burton C. Morris RI 25th Poster Signing
 

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
University Center
Merson Courtyard
(Rain location: Kirr Commons)

 

Burton C. Morris RI 25th Poster Signing

 
  6:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Carnegie Science Center
Pittsburgh, PA

(by invitation only)

Registration closed

[ Directions & Map ]
 

 

Robot Hall of Fame

The Robot Hall of Fame recognizes excellence in robotics technology worldwide and honors the fictional and real robots that have inspired and made breakthrough accomplishments in robotics.
 
 
  6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 

Reception

 
  7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 

Induction Ceremony

Inductees:
   ASIMO
   ASTRO BOY
   C-3PO
   Robby, the Robot
   Shakey
 
  9:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

Burton C. Morris RI 25th Poster Signing

 
Tuesday, October 12, 2004  Community Day [ Mon ] [ Wed
    Robotics Institute-to-Business Session
  Robotics Seminar Marathon
  Robotics Demonstrations & Competitions
  Tech Gallery
 
 

8:30 a.m. - 12:00 n.
University Center,
Peter / Wright / McKenna / Dowd Rooms

(Refreshments in Pake Room)

(see individual talks for time and location)

Robotics Institute-to-Business Session

Moderators:
Rob Conway
Project Manager, Carnegie Mellon Innovation Transfer Center
Jim Osborn
Executive Director, Medical Robotics Technology Center, Robotics Institute
Bill Swisher
Associate Director, Corporate Relations, Carnegie Mellon

Experts forecast that by 2005 revenues from the commercialization of mobile robots will reach $5.4 billion. As a world-renowned center for research and development, the Carnegie Mellon University's Robotics Institute is at the forefront of this emerging industry.

From 8:30 a.m. - 12:00 n., at special business briefings, Carnegie Mellon and local educators will present overviews of their research. Topics include medical and surgical robotics; manufacturing robotics and automation; robots for defense and homeland security; 2D and 3D computer vision; human-robot interaction.
 

 
 

8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.

Robotics Institute-to-Business Session ( ri2B, Session 1 )

Session 1A [ 8:30 - McKenna Room ]

Steve Smith
Research Professor, Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Decision Systems
Title: Dynamic Scheduling Technologies for Large-Scale Operations
Research stage: middle

Session 1A [ 8:45 - McKenna Room ]

Doug James
Assistant Professor, Center for Foundations of Robotics, Medical Robotics Technology Center, Robotics Institute, Department of Computer Science
Title: Accelerated Deformable Simulations
Research stage: early

Session 1A [ 9:00 - McKenna Room ]

Paul Scerri
Systems Scientist, Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Decision Systems
Title: Large-Scale Robot Agent Person Coordination for First Responders
Research stage: middle

Session 1A [ 9:15 - McKenna Room ]

Simon Baker
Research Scientist, Vision and Autonomous Systems Center
Title 1: Real-Time Head-Pose and Gaze Estimation for User Interfaces, Games, and Low-Bandwidth Video-Conferencing
Research stage: middle
Title 2: Markerless Human Body Modeling, Tracking, and Rendering for User Interfaces, Games, and Tele-Surgery
Research stage: early


Session 1B [ 8:30 - Peter Room ]

Howie Choset
Associate Professor, Robotics Institute, Mechanical Engineering
Title: Robots that Crawl, Cover, and Climb
Research stage: early to middle

Session 1B [ 8:45 - Peter Room ]

Metin Sitti
Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute & Mechanical Engineering
Title: Gecko-inspired Dry Adhesives Technology
Research stage: middle

Session 1B [ 9:00 - Peter Room ]

George Stetten
M.D., Research Scientist, Vision and Autonomous Systems Center, Robotics Institute, Associate Professor, Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh
Title: A Sonic FlashlightTM in Every Clinician's Pocket
Research stage: middle

Session 1B [ 9:15 - Peter Room ]

William L. "Red" Whittaker
Fredkin Research Professor, Field Robotics Center
Title: NYA
Research stage: middle to late
 


Session 1C [ 8:30 - Wright Room ]

Robert Collins
Associate Research Professor, Vision and Autonomous Systems Center
Title: Surveillance and Biometrics at the Robotics Institute
Research stage: middle
 

Session 1C [ 8:45 - Wright Room ]

John Dolan
Senior Systems Scientist, Vision and Autonomous Systems Center
Title: Mobile and Stationary Sensor Network Analysis and Management
Research stage: early
 

Session 1C [ 9:00 - Wright Room ]

Sanjiv Singh
Associate Research Professor, Field Robotics Center, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Sensor Networks for Data Aggregation and Control
Research stage: middle
 

Session 1C [ 9:15 - Wright Room ]

Scott Thayer
Systems Scientist, Field Robotics Center
Title: Personal Sensor Webs and Location without GPS
Research stage: middle
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

Robotics Institute-to-Business Session ( ri2B, Session 2 )

Session 2A [ 10:00 - McKenna Room ]

Reid Simmons
Research Professor, Center for Foundations of Robotics, Associate Director of Education
Title: Putting on a Human Face: Socially Aware Technology
Research stage: emerging

Session 2A [ 10:15 - McKenna Room ]

Kyoung "Harry" Kim
Project Scientist, Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Decision Systems
Title: Intelligent Sheet Metal Bending
Research stage: late

Session 2A [ 10:30 - McKenna Room ]

Yanxi Liu
Research Scientist, Medical Robotics Technology Center
Title: Semantic-based Large Biomedical Image Database Indexing and Retrieval
Research stage: late

Session 2A [ 10:45 - McKenna Room ]

Joseph Giampapa
Project Manager, Center for Integrated Manufacturing and Decision Systems
Title: Autonomous Agents for Emergency Responses
Research stage: early to middle


Session 2B [ 10:00 - Peter Room ]

Tony Stentz
Research Professor, Field Robotics Center, Associate Director, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Semi-Autonomous Navigation for Outdoor Work Vehicles
Research stage: middle to late

Session 2B [ 10:15 - Peter Room ]

Illah Nourbakhsh
Associate Professor, Vision and Autonomous Systems Center, Center for the Foundations of Robotics
Title: The Toy Robots Initiative and Educational Robotics
Research stage: middle to late

Session 2B [ 10:30 - Peter Room ]

Cam Riviere
Systems Scientist, Medical Robotics Technology Center
Title 1: Self-contained Hand Tremor Reduction in a Microsurgical Instrument
Research stage: late

Title 2: A Mobile Robot for Minimally Invasive Cardiac Interventions
Research stage: early to middle

Session 2B [ 10:45 - Peter Room ]

Al Kelly
Associate Research Professor, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Survey, Guidance and Safety Systems for Man-driven and Autonomous Industrial Trucks
Research stage: middle to late


Session 2C [ 10:00 - Wright Room ]

John Bares
Associate Research Professor; Director, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Rapid Application of Robotic Technologies to New Product Development
Research stage: middle to late

Session 2C [ 10:15 - Wright Room ]

Bernardine Dias
Special Research Scientist, Field Robotics Center
Title: The TechBridgeWorld Initiative
Research stage: early

Session 2C [ 10:30 - Wright Room ]

Robin Shoop
Educational Outreach Coordinator, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Carnegie Mellon Robotics Academy
Research stage: late

Session 2C [ 10:45 - Wright Room ]

Red Team
Title: Red Team Racing and the DARPA Grand Challenge
Research stage: middle to late
 

 
 

11:30 a.m. - 12:00 n.

Robotics Institute-to-Business Session ( ri2B, Session 3 )
Technology Transfer Session

Session 3 [ 11:30 - McKenna Room ]

Marty Vander Velde
Senior Project Manager, Carnegie Mellon Innovation Transfer Center
Title: Doing Business with Carnegie Mellon

Session 3 [ 11:40 - McKenna Room ]

Steve DiAntonio
Business Development Director, National Robotics Engineering Consortium
Title: Maximizing Return from a University Sponsored Research Investment

Session 3 [ 11:50 - McKenna Room ]

Bill Thomasmeyer
Director, The Robotics Foundry
Title: The Robotics Foundry
 

 
 

9:15 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
University Center,
McConomy Auditorium

 

Robotics Seminar Marathon
(Presented by Carnegie Mellon personnel)

 

9:15 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
Welcome
Matt Mason
Director, Robotics Institute
 
 

9:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Mel Siegel
Associate Research Professor, Robotics Institute
Title: When Physics Rules Robotics: Range, Mobility, and Communication Limits on Big and Small Robots
 
 

10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
Metin Sitti
Assistant Professor, Robotics Institute & Mechanical Engineering
Title: Robotics at the Micro- and Nano-Scales
 
 

10:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Gary Fedder
Professor, Robotics Institute & Electrical and Computer Engineering
Title: Integrated Microelectromechanical Systems
 
 

11:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
George Stetten
M.D., Research Scientist, Robotics Institute & Associate Professor, Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh
Title: A Sonic FlashlightTM in Every Clinician's Pocket
 
 

11:30 a.m. - 12:00 n.
Sanjiv Singh
Assistant Research Professor, Robotics Institute
Title: Shared Control by Robots and Humans for Assembly Tasks
 
 

12:15 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Howie Choset
Associate Professor, Robotics Institute & Mechanical Engineering
Title: Hyper-Redundant Robots
 
 

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
Manuela Veloso
Professor, Robotics Institute & Computer Science
Title: The Challenges of Multi-Robot Teams in Adversarial Environments
 
 

1:30 p.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Steve Smith
Research Professor, Robotics Institute
Title: Execution-Driven Planning and Scheduling of Complex Multi-Agent Systems
 
 

2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Bernardine Dias
Special Research Scientist, Robotics Institute
Title: TechBridgeWorld: Towards Sustainable Global Technology Development
 
 

2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Reid Simmons
Research Professor, Robotics Institute & Computer Science
Title: Socially Interactive Robots
 
 

3:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Tuomas Sandholm
Associate Professor, Computer Science
Title: Combinatorial Exchanges with Preference Elicitation for Task and Resource Allocation among Robots
 
 

3:30 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Katia Sycara
Research Professor, Robotics Institute
Title: Agents: The Next Frontier of Web Services
 
 

4:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
William L. "Red" Whittaker
Fredkin Research Professor, Robotics Institute
Title: The Grand Challenges of Robotics Vehicles
 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
University Center,
Rangos Hall
The Cut
University Center Circle


 

Demonstrations & Competitions

 

10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.

Robotics Educational Technology Demonstration

High school teachers enrolled in the Carnegie Mellon-sponsored Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program will bring class projects to display. The students from these teachers' classrooms will take part in the display activities.
 

 

10:00 a.m. - 12:00 n.

Robotics Middle School Competition

The Robotics Academy based at the National Robotics Engineering Consortium will perform demonstrations and hold a Middle School Competition. Based on the annual FIRST LEGO League Competition, the Middle School Competition will consist of eight qualifying teams of ten children who will compete with robots that they will design, build, program, test, and debug.
 

 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Segway Soccer

(Manuela Veloso, Professor &
Brett Browning, Systems Scientist)

Humans vs. robots — on Segways . . . who will win?
Come and found out!

Soccer-playing humans against robots on Segways, it's not only fun but educational, as we push the envelope for robot teams. The techniques displayed here not only apply to soccer, but to anywhere robot teams are needed; including search and rescue, security, manufacturing, and logistics.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Project LISTEN

(Jack Mostow, Research Professor)

Project LISTEN is an interdisciplinary research project at Carnegie Mellon University that developed a novel tool to improve literacy — an automated Reading Tutor that displays stories on a computer screen, and listens to children read aloud. To provide a pleasant, authentic experience in assisted reading, the Reading Tutor lets the child choose from a menu of high-interest stories from Weekly Reader and other sources — including user-authored stories.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Snakebot

(Howie Choset, Associate Professor)

Researchers and students in Howie Choset's Intro to Mobile Robots class will demonstrate Snakebot, a serpentine robot with applications in search and rescue, bridge and tank inspection, surgical tasks, and bomb disarming.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Sonic FlashlightTM

(George Stetten, M.D., Research Scientist)

The Sonic FlashlightTM merges the visual outer surface of a patient with a simultaneous ultrasound scan of the patient's interior. Instead of looking away from the patient at an ultrasound monitor, the surgeon sees through skin and underlying tissue as if it were translucent.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Robotic Bagpiper

(Ben Brown, Project Scientist)

The Robotic Bagpiper will make its debut at the Robotics Institute 25th Anniversary celebration. The notion of a Robotic Bagpiper conjures a number of possibilities ranging from a highly dexterous, humanoid device that is able to pick up and play a variety of instruments while marching around the campus to a black box that simply emits bagpipe music. The robot may not look like a human bagpiper - aside from a few fragments of Tartan plaid - but will provide the functionality to play respectable music on a standard bagpipe instrument. It will aim to reflect the high-tech competence of the university as well as its Scottish heritage.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

RHex Robot

(Al Rizzi, Associate Research Professor)

RHex is a dynamic hexapod robot developed jointly by researchers from Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, McGill University, The University of Michigan, and UC Berkeley. Inspired by biomechanical insights into arthropod locomotion, RHex uses an alternating tripod gait (and other similarly-generated gaits) to locomote in a highly maneuverable and robust manner. RHex is currently capable of speeds exceeding five body lengths per second (2.5 m/s), negotiating a wide variety of rugged terrains over thousands of bodylengths (3700 m distance on one set of batteries), managing slopes exceeding 45 degrees, swimming, and climbing stairs.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Personal Exploration Rover

(Illah Nourbakhsh, Associate Professor)

The Personal Exploration Rover (PER) landed in science centers across the nation in January 2004, just when the NASA Mars Exploration Rovers landed and began to explore Mars. Visitors can hone their skills as space scientists by using PERs to look for signs of life in each rover's Mars Yard home.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Grace

(Reid Simmons, Research Professor)

GRACE is a socially-adept robot capable of attending conferences! She's participated in both the 2002 and 2003 AAAI Grand Challenge where she exceeded the expectations of both the crowd and the team members and represents a milestone in robotics.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Robot Seeks Life in Chilean Desert! [ Video Demo ]

(David Wettergreen, Associate Research Professor)

The Life in the Atacama project will be remotely investigating the Atacama Desert in northern Chile. Zoë, the mobile robot will be searching for microorganisms in the rocks and soil and mapping their distribution across kilometers of terrain. Roboticists along with biologists and geologists will guide Zoë from Carnegie Mellon. They will determine a daily plan of action and uplink it for the rover to execute autonomously. Zoë will communicate with Carnegie Mellon several times a day to report its progress.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Algorithms for Autonomous Learning [ Video Demo ]

(Andrew Moore, Professor)

Algorithms, especially algorithms which self-improve, are one of the fundamental technologies for autonomous machines. They have the problem that they are not often very exciting to read in isolation. In some cases they can be animated, and this display shows animations of some of the work in the Auton Lab, part of the Robotics Institute.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Gyrover

(Ben Brown, Project Scientist)

Gyrover is a single-wheel robot that is stabilized and steered by means of an internal, mechanical gyroscope. Gyrover can stand and turn in place, move deliberately at low speed, climb moderate grades, and move stably on rough terrain at high speeds. It has a relatively large rolling diameter which facilitates motion over rough terrain; a single track and narrow profile for obstacle avoidance; and is completely enclosed for protection from the environment.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Cut

Groundhog

(Scott Thayer, Systems Scientist)

Groundhog was developed in just under two months to brave the rigors of an abandoned mine.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Cut

Ferret

(Scott Thayer, Systems Scientist)

The Ferret mine mapping robot can be lowered down a borehole and produce three-dimensional maps using sonar and laser range finders that can then be used to assess mine conditions.
 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

The Cut

Cave Crawler


 

 
 

10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

University Center Circle

Red Team Racing

Red Team is a collaborative alliance of non-profit organizations, for-profit companies, and individuals unified by the goal of winning the Grand Challenge, and in so doing, substantially advancing the state-of-the-art in autonomous ground vehicles.
 

 
 

12:00 n. - 12:45 p.m.

Education Outreach Student Lunch & Talk

Howie Choset, Associate Professor
Hyper-Redundant Robots
 

 

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Newell-Simon Hall,
B Level

 

Tech Gallery

The Tech Gallery is being developed to give students and faculty working in computer science-related areas a venue to display creative research that reveals the artistic side of technology. The goal is to provide a forum where the art of technology can be discussed and revealed.

 
Wednesday, October 13, 2004  Grand Challenges of Robotics Symposium &
25th Anniversary Dinner
[ Tue ] [ Thu
    Grand Challenges of Robotics Symposium
  Robotics Instutute Founders' Panel
  The DaVinci Effect
  Robotics Institute 25th Anniversary Dinner
  Tech Gallery
 
 

Carnegie Music Hall
7:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
[ Directions & Maps ]
 

 

Grand Challenges of Robotics Symposium

 

7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall Atrium

 

Symposium Registration

 
 

7:30 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
Carnegie Music Hall Foyer

 

Continental Breakfast

 
 

8:30 a.m. - 8:45 a.m.

 

Welcome

David Bourne
Principal Systems Scientist & RI 25 Event Director
 
 

8:45 a.m. - 9:30 a.m.
 

  Vernor Vinge
Professor Emeritus, San Diego State University
Title: Robotics and the Technological Singularity




Host: Hans Moravec
 

9:30 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
 

  Robin Murphy
Professor, University of South Florida
Title: Up from the Rubble




Host: Katia Sycara
 

10:15 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
 

 

Midmorning Break & Book Signing

(Vernor Vinge & Robin Murphy)

 
 

10:30 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.
 

  Mitsuo Kawato
Director, ATR CNS Laboratories
Title: Computational Neuroscience and Humanoid Robotics




Host: Chris Atkeson
 

11:15 a.m. - 12:00 n.
 

  Bob Full
Chancellor's Professor, University of California at Berkeley
Title: Bipedal Bugs, Galloping Ghosts and Gripping Geckos: BioInspiration in the Age of Integration





Host: Matt Mason
 

12:00 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall Foyer

 

Lunch
(complimentary Carnegie Museum passes will be available for all registered attendees)

 

12:45 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.
 

  Marc Raibert
President, Boston Dynamics
Title: 25 Years of Dynamic Legged Robots: What's Changed and What Hasn't?




Host: Jessica Hodgins
 

1:30 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
 

  Takeo Kanade
U. A. & Helen Whitaker University Professor, Carnegie Mellon
Title: Revisiting Computer Vision - an AI Problem



Host: Chuck Thorpe
 

2:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
 

 

Midafternoon Break & Book Signing

(Vernor Vinge & Robin Murphy)

 
 

2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
 

  "Virtual" Ray Kurzweil
Founder & CEO, Kurzweil Industries
Title: The Web Within Us, When Minds and Machines Become One




Host: Raj Reddy
 

3:30 p.m. - 3:45 p.m.
 

 

Founders' Panel Introduction

Jared L. Cohon, President, Carnegie Mellon University


 
 

3:45 p.m. - 4:45 p.m.
 

 

Founders' Panel

Angel Jordan, University Professor Emeritus
Tom Murrin, Distinguished Service Professor, A.J. Palumbo School of Business Administration, Duquesne University
Raj Reddy, University Professor of Computer Science and Robotics
 
 

4:45 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

 

Recognition Awards

 

5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Carnegie Museum,
Scaife Gallery Atrium

 

Founders' Reception & exclusive 54th Carnegie International art exhibit viewing

 

5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
University Center,
Rangos Hall

 

The Da Vinci Effect Twilight Show

(snacks & beverages provided)
Featuring a special faculty performance!

The Da Vinci Effect is a multi-sensory, theatrical presentation demonstrating how Carnegie Mellon's powerful combination of disciplines ranging from the arts to technology produces innovations that can change our world.
 

 

6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Carnegie Music Hall Foyer

 

25th Anniversary Dinner
(buffet service, business casual)

 
 

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Newell-Simon Hall,
B Level

 

Tech Gallery

The Tech Gallery is being developed to give students and faculty working in computer science-related areas a venue to display creative research that reveals the artistic side of technology. The goal is to provide a forum where the art of technology can be discussed and revealed.

 
Thursday, October 14, 2004  Tours & Laurie Anderson Concert 
    Robotics Institute Tours [ morning & afternoon ]
  Laurie Anderson Concert
  Planetary Robotics Open House
  The DaVinci Effect [ lunch & matinée ]
  SCS Alumni Reception
  Tech Gallery
 
 

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
Newell-Simon Hall

 

Tours of the Robotics Institute and National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC)

Transportation will be provided from Newell-Simon Hall.

Registration closed

 
 

12 n. - 1:00 p.m.
Planetary Robotics Building

 

Planetary Robotics Open House


 

12 n. - 1:00 p.m.
University Center,
Rangos Hall

 

The Da Vinci Effect Brown Bag Lunch Show

(bring your lunch — beverages & dessert provided!)

The Da Vinci Effect is a multi-sensory, theatrical presentation demonstrating how Carnegie Mellon's powerful combination of disciplines ranging from the arts to technology produces innovations that can change our world.
 

 

1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Newell-Simon Hall

 

Tours of the Robotics Institute and National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC)

Transportation will be provided from Newell-Simon Hall.

Registration closed

 
 

9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Newell-Simon Hall,
B Level

 

Tech Gallery - Closing reception 4:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

The Tech Gallery is being developed to give students and faculty working in computer science-related areas a venue to display creative research that reveals the artistic side of technology. The goal is to provide a forum where the art of technology can be discussed and revealed.

 
 

4:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
University Center,
Rangos Hall

 

The Da Vinci Effect Matinée Show

(snacks & beverages provided)

The Da Vinci Effect is a multi-sensory, theatrical presentation demonstrating how Carnegie Mellon's powerful combination of disciplines ranging from the arts to technology produces innovations that can change our world.
 

 

4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Newell-Simon Hall,
Perlis Atrium

 

Alumni Reception
(all SCS alums are invited)

 
 

6:30 p.m.
Carnegie Mellon,
University Center Circle

 

Transportation to Laurie Anderson Concert departs
(transportation provided for Transportation Pass holders only)

 

8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Byham Theater,
Downtown Pittsburgh

[ Directions & Map ]

 

Laurie Anderson in Concert
(co-presented with the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust)

Purchase tickets online or call (412) 471 6930.

Transportation will be provided (for Transportation Pass holders only) from Newell-Simon Hall to the Byham Theater.

Violinist, composer, singer, sculptor, poet and leader in the use of multimedia in the arts — Laurie Anderson is renowned as one of the most eclectic and groundbreaking performers in the world. NASA chose Anderson as its first artist in residence for 2003 and she has collaborated with other innovative artists such as Brian Eno, Lou Reed, and Peter Gabriel. Wired magazine put her on the cover in 1994 with the headline:

"Laurie Anderson reinvents herself — again".

Ms. Anderson will premier her latest work, The End of the Moon, at this performance.
 

 
 

10:15 p.m.
Byham Theater,
Downtown Pittsburgh

 

Transportation to campus and hotels departs
(transportation provided for Transportation Pass holders only)

October 12 - 14, 2004  Transportation Pass Information 
 

The ri25 Transportation Pass will include service for Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, October 12 - 14, 2004.

 

Service will include:

Tuesday, October 12, 2004
Campus Shuttle between preferred hotels* and campus.
Shuttle Times:
7:00 - 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. & 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Wednesday, October 13, 2004
Event Shuttle between preferred hotels* and Carnegie Music Hall
(1 block from campus)
Shuttle Times:
7:00 - 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., 4:00 - 7:30 p.m. & 9:00 - 10:00 p.m.

Thursday, October 14th, 2004
Campus Shuttle between preferred hotels* and campus
Shuttle Times:
7:00 - 9:00 a.m., 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. & 4:00 - 6:00 p.m.
Event Shuttle from campus to / from the Laurie Andersen concert
(Byham Theater)
Shuttle Times:
6:30 - 7:15 p.m. & 10:00 - 11:00 p.m.
(Return shuttles will take passengers to preferred hotels* and campus)

Cost is $20.00 payable as part of registration.

* Preferred hotels are listed at

http://www.ri.cmu.edu/events/25th/accommodations.html